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How to maximise value in the cloud

In our early schooling, we learned the proverb “Every cloud has a silver lining”. Little did the person who coined the phrase in 1634 – poet John Milton – know how his advice would mean so much more in this age of cloudification. 

So how do we apply the saying to the complex matter of maximising value in the cloud?

IDG research has shown that two-thirds of corporations in some regions are running more than one distinct cloud service. 

Public cloud security breaches, system outages and disparate service advantages of providers have had enterprises scrambling to employ a hybrid multi-cloud infrastructure for performance benefits but also spread risk. 

But with this implementation strategy, costs can shoot up, and so does the requirement for skilled manpower.  

In fact, IDG reveals that 56 percent of respondents felt that managing multiple cloud platforms requires more internal expertise than what cloud providers would have us believe. And 40 percent of organisations using cloud services have been found to spend at least 20 percent of their team’s time on ongoing maintenance.

So with complexity in both choosing the best cloud strategy for your organisation and in executing that strategy with seamless integration and maximum flexibility and scalability… is there even a silver lining?

Maximising value despite the complexity

Analysing and simplifying the complexities and costs of integrating multiple public cloud and data centre infrastructure, the logical components of maximising value would be to:
 
1. Achieve seamless and real time connectivity to reduce the complexities (and therefore reduce costs and resources) of managing the hybrid cloud .

2. Employ a network system that offers simplified programmability/control

To achieve seamless connectivity between the public cloud platforms, the key is to employ direct connection because egress cost is lower

Once enterprises discover this silver lining, a slew of benefits lead to the reduction of complexity and cost, increase manageability, control and long-term value of investments.

In establishing a network that offers simplified programmability and control, software-defined networking (SDN) is a key component. 

This part of the silver lining in the cloud completes that overall network fabric that effectively wraps around the entire ecosystem and tightens control and oversight even across geographic boundaries. 

You get on-demand bandwidth with no fixed term contracts – a great way to obtain granular bandwidth and minimise unused capacity.

From lining to thread to fabric

SDNs present a self-service model that removes many of the complexities from global connectivity and enables users to control their services. 

On-demand connectivity is essential as a user experience that reduces the number of steps it takes to connect to the cloud or across the globe. 

Furthermore, SDN platforms are ready to scale to deliver 100G on-demand and beyond. Specialised connectivity providers such as Epsilon delivers granular 2Mb to 100G capacity for as short as 1 day via its MEF-cerfified global ethernet backbone. 

Next, with software comes programmability and granular control, and these facilitate the use of open application programming interfaces (APIs) that allow users to incorporate network services into their existing platforms or bundled with their solution. 

Whether that’s connecting cloud-based applications for financial institutions or IoT solutions for the Oil & Gas industry, APIs are growing into essential value-maximising parts of the silver lining.

For survival in the digital transformation landscape littered with expensive landmines, network ecosystems must continually evolve to serve new and growing user needs.

All the advantages of direct connection and SDN are just part of the solution that hardens enterprises for the future, while reaping cost effectiveness amidst the complexities.

So now that we have discovered the silver lining to weave powerful threads into a global connectivity fabric, the rest of the complexities can then be handled by data centre interconnection (DCI).

Delve into the details via our white papers to validate what global networking experts are discovering and advocating. Start the silver threads spinning soon.

Author


wlchin

Woon Lee Chin

Product Director